Derbyshire Places of Worship

St Peter's Church, Hope (1) (30k) St Peter's Church, Hope (2) (29k) St Peter's Church, Hope (3) (39k) Above Photograph(s)
Copyright of Andrew McCann/Pete Howard
St Peter's Church, Hope
St Peter's Church,
Pindale Road,
Hope, Derbyshire.

Cemeteries

This Church has (or had) a graveyard.

Note: any church within an urban environment may have had its graveyard closed after the Burial Act of 1853. Any new church built after that is unlikely to have had a graveyard at all.

Church History

This Place of Worship was founded before 1066, and we understand it is still open.

[Quote, from Notes from a Peakland Parish]
"There was certainly a church at Hope before the Conquest, as the Domesday Survey records the previous existence of both church and priest there. The present edifice, dedicated to St. Peter, most probably occupies the same site as the original Saxon structure; though mainly of fourteenth and fifteenth century date, with a few relics of the thirteenth century. To the fourteenth century, or Decorated period, belong the tower and spire, parts of the outer walls, the arches and columns in the nave, and the south doorway. The south porch and parvise or priest's room over it, the windows, clerestory, low pitched roof, and battlements and crocketts, are undoubtedly in the Perpendicular style of the following century. The only remains of thirteenth century date in the church are a small piscina in the south aisle with dog-tooth (Early English) moulding, and some tomb slabs bearing floreated crosses, which were found beneath the foundation wall of the old chancel when it was pulled down. Two of these slabs, now reared against the wall within the church near the north doorway, bear also such objects of the chase as a sword, an arrow and a hunting horn; in token doubtless of some office held in connexion with the Royal Forest of the Peak."

"In the churchyard can now be seen the greater portion of an ancient Saxon cross, removed in recent years from the Vicarage garden. The original position of the cross is not known, but it was discovered when the old school house was demolished in 1858 and replaced by the school building, occupying the same site, close to the Vicarage garden. The old Free School of Hope consisted of a school house and master's residence combined, with a small garden attached. The cross was found in two separate pieces, one forming the lintel of a door and the other built into the school house wall. Together they form a continuous shaft, standing about seven feet high; the upper part of the cross is missing. The design is of interlaced knot work and foliage, with a very crude and imperfect representation of the cross and figures of the Virgin and St. John on either side."

The following information about the Church has been provided to accompany the photographs on the right. A list of people who have supplied the information is included in the Acknowledgements, below.

[Image 3] There is information about the Cross in Chapter I of William Smith Porter's book Notes from a Peakland Parish.

Lyndsey Porter[1] suggests it dates from the 11th century.

Reference:
[1] Porter, Lindsey - The Peak District: Its Secrets & Curiousities. Moorland Publishing Co. Ltd. 1988. ISBN 0 86190 240 8.[1]

Denomination

Now or formerly Church of England.

If more than one congregation has worshipped here, or its congregation has united with others, in most cases this will record its original dedication.

Maps

This Church is located at OS grid reference SK1723583458. You can see this on various mapping systems. Note all links open in a new window:

Reference

  • Places recorded by the Registrar General under the provisions of the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (2010) is available as a "Freedom of Information" document from the website What Do They Know.

Acknowledgements

A special thanks to the following people who have contributed information for this web page:

1. Information provided by Rosemary Lockie.

Last updated on 22 Aug 2012 at 09:05.

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This Report was created 10 Sep 2017 - 03:00:48 BST from information held in the Derbyshire section of the Places of Worship Database. This was last updated on 4 Jun 2017 at 08:14.

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