Gloucestershire Places of Worship

St Mary the Virgin's Church, Yate (1) (32k) St Mary the Virgin's Church, Yate (2) (28k) St Mary the Virgin's Church, Yate (3) (29k) Above Photograph(s)
Copyright of Phil Draper/Alf Beard
Visit Church Crawler Church Crawler's
Flickr site
St Mary the Virgin's Church, Yate
St Mary the Virgin's Church (link to Church's website)
Church Road, BS37 5BG,
Yate, Gloucestershire.

Cemeteries

This Church has (or had) a graveyard.

Note: any church within an urban environment may have had its graveyard closed after the Burial Act of 1853. Any new church built after that is unlikely to have had a graveyard at all.

Church History

This Place of Worship was founded in the 12th century, and we understand it is still open.

Kelly's Directory of 1923 describes Yate as a parish on the river Frome, with a station on the Bristol and Birmingham branch of the Midland railway, 2½ miles west-north-west from Chipping Sodbury station on the new section of the Patchway to Wootton Bassett branch of the Great Western railway, and 10 north-east from Bristol. St Mary's Church is described as "an ancient building of stone in various styles, consisting of chancel, with aisles, nave, north aisle, north transept, north and south chapels, south porch and a western tower containing 6 bells" There is a brass with effigy to Alexander Staples, d.1590, and his two wives, Avis and Elizabeth, and eleven children, and a somewhat curious Latin inscription.

Arthur Mee's The King's England series for Gloucestershire provides a rather more lyrical description of the brass as "one of the treasures of this most interesting church ... Alexander Staples, who was alive when Shakespeare was young, is shown (near the altar of the south chapel) in a brass with his two wives and 11 children, all small figures exquisitely gowned, with quaint expressions".

The inscription has been (roughly) translated as follows:

"This stone guards the body of Alexander Staples. His spirit is concerned with heavenly things in the abode of the blessed. When at the last the trumpet shall sound tarantara, God will join his mortal limbs to his spirit again. He died on St Bernard's Day three hundred and eighteen lustres after Christ (1590). His sorrowing Elizabeth erected this monument to her husband as a token of a wife's devotion".

Kelly's account also mentions a memorial to Hodges Godwin, jun. esq. d.1677; and an inscription to Henry Wogan esq. d. 1661. The stained east window has a design after Albert Durer and there are others to Mr. and Mrs. Edward Burges, of The Ridge, Yate (1898), the Rev. W.S. Goodenough, a former rector, and his widow (1877), Mrs. A.E. Toler (1899), and to the Rev. D.C. Randolph and his son, W.C. Randolph (1898).

The parish records date from 1660. The living in 1923, was a rectory, in the gift of W.R. Emmott esq. and had been held since 1922 by the Rev. Herbert Forster Forster-Morris M.A. of Worcester College, Oxford. Yate Court, built by one of the lords of Berkeley, garrisoned and afterwards burnt by Cromwell's troops was in ruins, "but a fine archway still remains". Stanshawes Court, a large and handsome mansion of stone, erected in 1874, was the residence of Frank Charles Clifford esq. Yate Lawn, a well preserved gabled house of the Elizabethan period, was the residence of Ernest Augustus Hitchens esq. J.P. Also mentioned were Yate House, and The Ridge, residences of W.P. and R.A. Fox esqrs., and Col. William Edward Parry Burges O.B.E. D.L.

The following information about the Church has been provided to accompany the photographs on the right. A list of people who have supplied the information is included in the Acknowledgements, below.

[Image 1] Once upon a time, Yate was a smallish village, and Chipping Sodbury a pleasant market town situated to north-east of Bristol.

Today in their place stands the sprawling dormitory town of Yate, named in the top twenty ugliest towns in Britain, which has all but embraced its once larger and more important neighbour, often called ‘Sodding Yatesbury’ by Bristolians. The seemingly one town preserves vigorously its boundaries, but you can only tell when you pass a road sign!

Yate is a typical 1960s town, housing estates of concrete and glass boxes, wide dual carriageways, and a purpose built shopping centre which is showing its age today. Somewhere on the estates is the new multipurpose parish centre of St Nicholas, which seems to have taken over from the medieval parish church of St Mary which alone seems to preserve a feeling of countryside in amongst all the tarmac and concrete.

St Mary has a stunning tower, and the picture shows the building seemingly basking in sunshine, unlike me who was being assaulted by a bitterly cold wind![1]

Denomination

Now or formerly Church of England.

If more than one congregation has worshipped here, or its congregation has united with others, in most cases this will record its original dedication.

Maps

This Church is located at OS grid reference ST7137382819. You can see this on various mapping systems. Note all links open in a new window:

Reference

  • Places recorded by the Registrar General under the provisions of the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (2010) is available as a "Freedom of Information" document from the website What Do They Know.

Acknowledgements

A special thanks to the following people who have contributed information for this web page:

1. Information provided by Phil Draper.

Last updated on 27 Jan 2014 at 09:11.

Search for other Places of Worship in Gloucestershire

Search Tips:

You can specify either a Place, or OS Grid Reference to search for. When you specify a Place, only entries for that place will be returned, with Places of Worship listed in alphabetical order. If you specify a Grid Reference, Places of Worship in the immediate vicinity will be listed, in order of distance from the Grid Reference supplied. The default is to list 10, but you can specify How Many you want to see, up to a maximum of 100.

You can further refine your search by supplying other search terms.

Please note the above provides a search of selected fields in the Gloucestershire section of the Places of Worship Database on this site (churchdb.gukutils.org.uk) only. For other counties, or for a full search of the Database, you might like to try the site's Google Custom Search, which includes full webpage content.

Further Information

This site provides historical information about churches, other places of worship and cemeteries. It has no affiliation with the churches or congregations themselves, nor is it intended to provide a means to find places of worship in the present day.

For current information you should contact the place of worship directly via their website.

Do not copy any part of this page or website other than for personal use or as given in our Terms and Conditions of Use.

You may wish to take a look at our About the Places of Worship Database page for an overview of the information provided, and any limitations which may be present.

This Report was created 22 Aug 2017 - 10:19:42 BST from information held in the Gloucestershire section of the Places of Worship Database. This was last updated on 4 Jul 2017 at 10:50.

URL of this page: http://churchdb.gukutils.org.uk/GLS560.php
Logo by courtesy of the Open Clip Art Library