Worcestershire Places of Worship

St Mary Magdalene, Croome d'Abitot (1) (21k) St Mary Magdalene, Croome d'Abitot (2) (23k) St Mary Magdalene, Croome d'Abitot (3) (31k) St Mary Magdalene, Croome d'Abitot (4) (28k) St Mary Magdalene, Croome d'Abitot (5) (29k) St Mary Magdalene, Croome d'Abitot (6) (29k) St Mary Magdalene, Croome d'Abitot (7) (17k) St Mary Magdalene, Croome d'Abitot (8) (30k) Above Photograph(s)
Copyright of Mel Lockie
St Mary Magdalene, Croome d'Abitot
St Mary Magdalene,
Croome d'Abitot, Worcestershire.

Cemeteries

We believe the Church did NOT have a graveyard.

Note: any church within an urban environment may have had its graveyard closed after the Burial Act of 1853. Any new church built after that is unlikely to have had a graveyard at all.

Church History

This Place of Worship was founded in 1763, though it is now closed, but we don't yet know when.

The following information about the Church has been provided to accompany the photographs on the right. A list of people who have supplied the information is included in the Acknowledgements, below.

[Image 1] St Mary Magdalene is a relatively new church, designed in the 1750s as part of a grand plan by Capability Brown to replace the Jacobean Manor House at Croome on behalf of the 6th Earl of Coventry. The original medieval church - typically for its time - was adjacent to the Manor House, and was demolished, but rather than rebuild on the same spot, Brown chose to place the new church at a distance, on a a low hill, to act as a focal point in the newly-landscaped Croome Park.

The church is now closed for worship, and in the care of the Churches Conservation Trust, whilst Capability's Croome Court, and its Park now belong to the National Trust.[1]

[Image 2] The interior of both Croome Park, and its church are attributed to Robert Adam, and were completed in 1763. Some very splendid monuments to earlier members of the Coventry family, brought from the medieval church when it was demolished, now occupy strategic positions against the walls.[1]

[Image 3] A feature of Croome church is the archways in the base of its tower. The main entrance to the church is through the archway on the west side, whilst those on its north and south sides are permanently blocked with masonry. The whole does nevertheless have a pleasing symmetry, and one might imagine in a warmer country, they might have been left open.[2]

[Image 4] This is just one of several grand memorials to the Earls of Coventry in Croome Church.

The inscription reads:

Thomas Baro Coventrye de
Allensborough Dominus
Custos Magni Sigilli
Angliae et ex initmis
Caroli Regis concilijs;
Republica integerrime,
privata moderatissime
administrata post impensam tantis negotijs vitam,
famae, non annoru, plenus,
ingenti omium mœreore,
sed maiore damno,
iam sexagenarius hic
fessus honoratusqe
decubuit.
XIIIIo. die Januarij
M. DC. XXXIX.[3]

[Image 5] This is just one of several grand memorials to the Earls of Coventry in Croome Church.

The inscription reads:

In Obitum
Clarissimæ Mulieris Mariæ, Thomæ Coventrye filij natu maximi
Thomæ Baronis Coventrye de Allesborough Dni. custodis magni
Sigilli Anglicæ plæ uxoris fæmina equidem admodum admiranda cui
forma, (et quæ sexvi rarior) virtutis prodigus deus Vultus vitra
fæminem venusti, anumi ultra masculum generosi, famæ illibatæ
vitæ intergerrimæ fælicis acuminus, iudicij nervosi, eloquij facilis
linguæ bene moderatæ passionum tranquilla victrix, dotum
deniq, omnium non tantum prvdens, sedit tranquilla moderatrix
quatuor liberorum fæcunda mater, Ad ultimum fatale invenit
puperperium filium invita lucina potius ad funus quam vitam enixa
quo:cum dum dividere tentat vitah, perdit, ipsaq, brevi post
infantem intervallo communi comitata luctu,
fato cessit
Obiit 18o Octobris 1634. Ætatis suæ 29o.

This Memorial is on one wall of the Chancel. On the opposite side is a matching one commemorating Thomas himself, who died in 1661.[3]

[Image 6] This is just one of several grand memorials to the Earls of Coventry in Croome Church.

The inscription reads:

Thomas Dominis Coventrye Baro Coventrye de Allesborough
Paterni nominis, honorois, opum & virtutum.
Hœres. at Promotor
Inconcussæ erga Deum, Principem at Patriam fidei.
Æquissimæ in arduis, et bonis rebus mentis,
Magnificus elegantarium cuitor.
Erga suos paterfamilias vigilantissimus,
Erga clienteias Dominus æquus, & bonus
Erga pauperes benignus,
Erga omnes justus.
Ubiq. inculpatus.
Hic
Juxta charissiman Conjugem
Guilielmi Domini Craven
Illius Herois sororem
Sepulturæ majorum fuorum additus
Ætatis LV
Anno Christi 1661.

This Memorial is on the wall of the Chancel. On the opposite side is a matching one commemorating Thomas's wife Mary, who died in 1634 aged 29.[3]

[Image 7] Plasterwork and ceiling detail in Croome d'Abtitot church, as designed by Robert Adam in the 1750s.[1]

[Image 8] This is just one of several grand memorials to the Earls of Coventry in Croome Church.

It commemorates Henry (Henricus) Coventry, who died on 7th December 1686, aged 70.[3]

Denomination

Now or formerly Church of England.

If more than one congregation has worshipped here, or its congregation has united with others, in most cases this will record its original dedication.

Maps

This Church was located in the town/village nearest OS grid reference SO885448. You can see this on various mapping systems. Note all links open in a new window:

Resources

I have found many websites of use whilst compiling the information for this database. Here are some which deserve mention as being of special interest for Croome d'Abitot, and perhaps to Local History and Places of Worship as a whole.

The above links were selected and reviewed at the time I prepared the information, but please be aware their content may vary, or disappear entirely. These factors are outside my control.

Acknowledgements

A special thanks to the following people who have contributed information for this web page:

1. Information provided by Rosemary Lockie.

2. Information provided by Mel Lockie.

3. Account & Transcription provided by Rosemary Lockie.

Information last updated on 3 Feb 2011 at 00:00.

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This Report was created 13 Nov 2019 - 21:51:38 GMT from information held in the Worcestershire section of the Places of Worship Database. This was last updated on 7 Feb 2019 at 12:48.

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