Derbyshire Places of Worship

St Peter's Church, Edensor (1) (25k) St Peter's Church, Edensor (2) (23k) St Peter's Church, Edensor (3) (29k) Above Photograph(s)
Copyright of Andrew McCann/Godfrey Bowring/Alf Beard
St Peter's Church, Edensor
St Peter's Church,
Chatsworth Estate,
Edensor, Derbyshire.

Cemeteries

This Church has (or had) a graveyard.

Note: any church within an urban environment may have had its graveyard closed after the Burial Act of 1853. Any new church built after that is unlikely to have had a graveyard at all.

Church History

This Place of Worship was founded in the 14th century, and we understand it is still open.

Kelly's Directory of 1932 describes Edensor as a township, parish and village, just outside Chatsworth park, 3 miles from Hassop station, on the Midland section of the London, Midland and Scottish railway, 2½ east-north-east from Bakewell and 8½ from Matlock. The church of St Peter, "standing on an eminence and approached by a flight of steps, was almost entirely rebuilt under the direction of Sir G. Gilbert Scott R.A. in 1867". It consists of chancel, nave, aisles, south porch, bell-cote on the eastern gable of the nave, and a tower at the west end with lofty broach spire, containing 6 bells, partly recast from the former 4 bells in 1867, one of which, dated 1669, is now hung over the stables at Chatsworth.

The nave is separated from the aisles by arcades of four arches, several of these, as well as the ancient Norman columns, being part of the original church. The south porch retains portions of Norman work, and several ancient slabs, with incised crosses, have been built into it.

The return to the Religious Census of 1851 (HO 129/449/1/21/37) for "Edensor Church", records an estimated congregation on March 30th of 157 in the morning, with a class of 54 Sunday Scholars. It was completed by Henry J. Ellison, the Vicar, who gave his address as "Edensor, Bakewell".

This was of course compiled before the Church was rebuilt. Probably the most notable difference between then and now is that it had a tower, and no spire. Those interested in a fuller description may wish to consult pp.552-553 of White's 1857 Directory of Derbyshire, transcribed by Neil Wilson.

Many of the monuments were, of course transferred, including a brass, now set against the north wall of the chancel, with an inscription and effigy to James Beton, Comptroller of the Household to Mary Queen of Scots, who died in 1570, during the time the Queen was a prisoner at Chatsworth House - of dysentery, aged 32. The brass was erected by his brothers, James, Archbishop of Glasgow, and Andrew, Ambassador to France. On the north side is a brass to Mr John Philips, of Chatsworth (1735) and in the chancel is a memorial window to Lord Frederick Charles Cavendish P.C. M.P. Chief Secretary for Ireland, assassinated in Phoenix park, Dublin, in 1882.

The parish register dates from 1540, "and is in fair condition". The living was (in 1932) a vicarage in the gift of the Duke of Devonshire, and had been held since 1918 by the Rev. William Horace Foster Pegg M.A. of University College, Oxford.

The following information about the Church has been provided to accompany the photographs on the right. A list of people who have supplied the information is included in the Acknowledgements, below.

[Image 1] The present St Peter's Church replaces a 14th Century building. The rebuilding was commissioned by the 7th Duke of Devonshire, to a design by George Gilbert Scott. It was completed in 1868, and the new church was consecrated in 1870.

Scott based his design on that of the old church, and much of the old stone was used in the new, though it took two years to demolish, and complete the rebuild. It is supposed that this lengthy time was due to the care which was needed to preserve the Cavendish Monument (to William 1st Earl of Devonshire, and his brother Henry), which had to be dismantled and stored, whilst the rebuilding took place.

Reference
Naylor, Diane - The Chatsworth Villages: Beeley, Edensor & Pilsey, 2005.[1]

[Image 2] Although regretfully it isn't possible to see individual plot numbers on this plan, this photograph does give you an idea of what to expect if you are fortunate enough to be able to visit the church.[1]

Denomination

Now or formerly Church of England.

If more than one congregation has worshipped here, or its congregation has united with others, in most cases this will record its original dedication.

Maps

This Church is located at OS grid reference SK2507969898. You can see this on various mapping systems. Note all links open in a new window:

Reference

  • Places recorded by the Registrar General under the provisions of the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (2010) is available as a "Freedom of Information" document from the website What Do They Know.

Acknowledgements

A special thanks to the following people who have contributed information for this web page:

1. Information provided by Rosemary Lockie.

Last updated on 8 Jan 2015 at 14:27.

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This Report was created 4 May 2017 - 07:30:31 BST from information held in the Derbyshire section of the Places of Worship Database. This was last updated on 27 Aug 2016 at 10:57.

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